Thursday, 24 March 2011

The mobile (cell) phone is a ubiquitous part of modern life. I understand the wisdom of carrying a phone for use in an emergency. What I cannot fathom is how some people appear unable to be out of contact with their friends for even a short time.

I see young mothers with little children walking to school and it saddens me that instead of talking to their children they are having animated conversations on the phone.

What lost opportunities! Every day, travelling the same route, small things can be noticed, insignificant in the grand scheme of things, but well worth observing and commenting on – a flower open where there was a bud yesterday, a dog gazing out of a window, a beautiful cat asking to be stroked, birds courting and nesting.

Walking in the forest with the dogs is one of life’s great joys for me but I see people chattering on their phones and paying little attention to their pets or their surroundings. I must admit that before Barry retired he would receive work-related calls while walking and before that, when he was still running regularly, he would even dictate into a small Dictaphone as he ran. The recordings caused some amusement to those who had to use his notes, punctuated with heavy breathing as they were. Now he is free to enjoy the fresh air and watch our beautiful dogs as they gambol and explore and (Labradors, at least) tirelessly retrieve and swim.

I remember my parents constantly pointing things out to my siblings and me. There is always something of interest to be noted. How are children to understand a world greater than themselves if they are not shown it in small ways, every day? Of course they will learn in school but their minds are so much more alive to their surroundings if they are stimulated and knowledge of the natural world assimilated – it’s so easy and interesting to talk to children. Catching up with friends can happen later. Children grow up and leave home and those early years of curiosity and simplicity can never be recalled or reinvented. 

13 comments:

  1. you are invited to follow my blog

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  2. Hello again, Jabblog.
    I totally agree. Back in the day when I was a youth (this ages me somewhat), we didn't even have cell phones or anything else they use nowadays to communicate with each other. Times have really changed!

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  3. I agree with you about a lot of this (particularly the part about where we forget to stop and appreciate that which surrounds us,)

    But having the cell phones is certainly a convenience, Even my two eleven year olds each have a cell phone but it is helpful if I need to reach them (or they me) at friends' homes - plus they send me cute and funny messages.

    I think it's more about the balance we need to strike when dealing with technology. ☼

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  4. I think this applies to everyone, not just people with children. People have their phones glued to their ears everywhere. It's sad....an object is more important than people.

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  5. Cell phones have their place, but I think when you're with people - face to face - the phone should be gone (unless there's an emergency).

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  6. I, too, wonder why housewives and the mothers of toddlers are constantly glued to their phones. Seems like a waste of time to me.

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  7. I totally agree with you ! I use my mobile to call Mr. G to tell him to buy this or that or if I am late or for a special case. With my friends it's the same it's only if I am late or I ask them if they are at home. It would never come into my mind to have a whole conversation outside the house ! And mobile conversations are still expensive in Belgium.

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  8. I go out in the woods with my camera to take photos, and sometimes I see people walking and talking on their cell phones. They seem not to notice the beauty of nature around them. Very sad, no phone call is THAT important.

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  9. I can't believe that people really feel they have to be 'connected' to everyone all the time. They say never say never, but I don't see me EVER being connected to the social networks as many are. I value my privacy and peace much too much.

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  10. There's one family member (who shall remain nameless) who often has a Blue Tooth in his ear. I'm never positive he's really concentrating on what I'm saying.

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  11. Interesting and worthwhile post. There's a time and place for everything. What I can't understand are the people who are 'on the phone' while being served at supermarket cashouts.

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  12. I agree Janice, and what really has me worried is the fact that I have observed youngsters 'chatting' to each other via their cell 'phones, whilst actually in the classroom, during lessons, and often making very rude remarks about their teachers!It takes 'talking in class' to a whole new level, and makes me quite cross! (gripe over) x Best wishes, Sylvia

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