Friday, 15 July 2011

Two in Tandem Harvest

'Two in Tandem' is the brainchild of Jinksy and you'll find more responses to her prompt here.
Graphic copyright Jinksy

On Wednesday I watched the combine harvesters moving noiselessly up and down the fields, dust billowing around them. They were soundless because I saw them through the car window as we travelled back from Portsmouth.

July always seems too early for reaping when schools and churches don’t celebrate Harvest until September or October. Of course, by then the tree fruits are ripe, except for cherries, which have enjoyed their short season in June or July. Strawberries and raspberries have a longer period, though gooseberries seem as short-lived as redcurrants and blackcurrants.

But then, why is Harvest not cause for rejoicing throughout the year? Each month brings forth new delights – sweet violets in winter can thicken soup or add colour and flavour to salads of leaves or fresh fruit. I suppose Harvest is applauded at the time of year when most crops are in abundance. For me, rejoicing in Nature’s bounty is timeless, since I’m not a farmer and don’t rely on cash crops, but the sight of a wheat field, preferably with rich poppies bordering the corn, is beyond measure – a joy to be relished each year, despite the fact that the harvesters always catch me unawares.

However, when the days shorten and the nights lengthen, there is the satisfaction of sweet chestnuts and cob nuts, blackberries, wild mushrooms and sloes. There are always treasures to be garnered, if we look hard enough. 

16 comments:

  1. A lovely post. We used to live with our garden running into a meadow and your description of the combine harvesters and the billowing dust bought back such memories. :-)

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  2. Funnily enough, I have a 'cornfield with poppies' picture I did the other day. I'll email it! LOL

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  3. Wow! Unique take on the prompt.

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  4. I like what you said about there always being treasures to be garnered. Yes, every season brings its delights.

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  5. HA! Creative thinking, Janice. We truly do begin the harvest much earlier than September. :)

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  6. Beautiful post. Your descriptions are captivating.

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  7. Nice post and a lovely painting. I think there are some treasures to be found without looking very hard. Have a great weekend!

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  8. Autumn is one of my favorite times of year, and with temps soaring to 3 digits, I'm so ready for it.

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  9. Our farmer are complaining bitterly about the harvest this year ! First it was too dry now it's to wet ! I too love to see yellow fields with green borders looking like a patchwork.

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  10. Maybe the abundance of harvest times (and the variety) is why Jews have a blessing we say when we eat a new fruit or veg for the first time each year. The first tomato plucked off the vine, the first raspberry, the first squash, the first carrot . . . I loved this post Janice. When I finally get here I'm always sorry I don't do it more often.

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  11. A very unique and creative take on the prompt. I have wondered too about the fall harvest festivals. The crops in our area are gathered long before October when our festival is held.

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  12. It is always wonderful to reap a harvest. I'm glad there's a special time to celebrate, though, too. Although you're right. It IS a long time after reaping - surely it didn't take them THAT long to get the harvest in, in the olden days?

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  13. Hello Janice, your descriptions are captivating and let me think about the real meaning of HARVEST.
    cONGRATS
    NICE SUNDAY, SWEETHEART

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  14. I love the seasonal crops throughout the year, too. They truly are treasures each month and we stock up on the fruits and vegetables when they are in season.This is a lovely and thoughtful post.

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  15. It's true, nature always offers a special harvest if we're observant enough to notice.

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  16. You obviously don't live in a town's center ;-)

    I'd love to harvest wild mushrooms from the woods, but I haven't yet found anyone who'd like to try if they are poisonous. Cowards!

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