Monday, 3 September 2012

Mag 133 Recall


Thanks go to Tess Kincaid who organises and hosts this meme. To read more Magpies please click here.
Summer Night, 1913, by Albert Bloch

Recall

It was there, just beyond reach. If only he could recall . . . Perhaps if he sat quietly for a while as the woman had suggested it might come back to him but that was something he couldn’t do. He paced. He looked about him. There were others in the house but he didn’t know them though some looked familiar. Why was he here? It wasn’t his home. He wanted to go home. Someone could take him - he had money. Then he could live on his own again. He didn’t like it here. He didn’t like the people. They stared at him and made him angry. He couldn’t understand what they were saying and they wouldn’t go away. He threw a cup at the woman nearest him. What was in the cup?

At meal-times he sat among strangers and ate food he hadn’t ordered though the woman told him he had. She had lied to him. Afterwards he paced again. Where were his parents? His sister had come to visit. She was older than him – fifty-six. He asked her about his parents. She told him they were dead. Why hadn’t anyone told him? He told her his things had been stolen. She found them in a drawer and showed them to him but they weren’t his. She was lying. Everyone was lying. No-one understood, no-one believed him. The fog in his head grew thicker and the words wouldn’t come.

His sister went to talk to the woman. He listened. The woman said, ‘Your father’s not too bad today, a little aggressive, but manageable.’

What did she mean? Her words were a blur. She was lying again.

‘He was trying to tell me about his boyhood home but he couldn’t remember the name. He got very agitated – his vocabulary is so limited now but he’s in remarkably good health for a man of his age. Ninety-eight next week, isn’t he?’

The man wrung his hands. He hated it here. He would escape and go home to . . . the name was there, just beyond reach.

His sister came back. What was she called?

 ‘Goodbye, Dad. See you in a few days.’

18 comments:

  1. This was indeed painful to read. So accurate, I fear. You captured the blur/confusion so well. I do hope they find a cure!!

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  2. Reminds me a little of "The Yellow Wallpaper." Good job!

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  3. I was primary caregiver for my mother who suffered with Alzheimer's and Lewy Body dementia ... you have described (with great care and sensitivity) what I witnessed so often in her memory care community.

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  4. Beautifully writtenn and quite moving...

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  5. It's a sad and cruel disease. We have had several family and friends afflicted. This is a very moving read Janice.

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  6. this is sad..the losing of things....the confusion...it is one of the things that scares me when my time comes....

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  7. Moving read Janice - you have captured the old mans feelings of isolation and frustration well.

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  8. The subject is very sad and touches me closely. You wrote it beautifully.

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  9. well done indeed....thanks for sharing your words

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  10. Oh, Janice, this is heartbreaking. And I can see why the Magpie prompt brought this to mind.
    The only good part of my late father's dementia was his determined idea that Mom was still with him. He never knew she had died two years before.
    Mom always used to say, "I hope he goes first, because he won't be able to get on by himself" but he didn't have to, he always thought she was right there.
    K

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  11. I think that's one of the worst diseases one can have ! You discribed it so well ! Fortunately the 100 year old man I always met in the retirement home where we have our painting classes, still appreciates women (!) and makes jokes, he only complains that he often falls asleep ! He gives hope !

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  12. great interpretation....thought you put across the confusion of alzhiemers really well ...thank you so much for sharing x

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  13. Very well done, but almost too close for comfort for me at the moment.

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  14. I have to confess it hits home to closely for my as well...but your delivery is deeply touching.

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  15. No no no, you are too good at this, this rings far too true for my liking.

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  16. So very sad but so very well written,

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  17. You've certainly captured this man's thoughts -- so many descriptive accounts I've read are from the perspective of the family member, caregiver or facility staff.

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